Pub_book_cover.gif

Dying to Meet You: 43 Old Cemetery Road
by Kate Klise / illustrated by M. Sarah Klise

Take a "LOOK INSIDE" the book

Ignatius B. Grumply moves into the Victorian mansion at 43 Old Cemetery Road hoping to find some peace and quiet so he can crack a wicked case of writer's block. But 43 Old Cemetery Road is already occupied by eleven-year-old Seymour, his cat Shadow, and an irritable ghost named Olive. It's hard to say who is more outraged. But a grumpy old ghost just might inspire this grumpy old man--and the abandoned kid? Well, let's just say his last name's Hope.
Sisters Kate and M. Sarah Klise, the creators of the award-winning Regarding the . . . series, offer up this debut volume in a clever new series told in letters, drawings, newspaper articles, a work-in-progress manuscript, and even an occasional tombstone engraving (description by publisher-Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).


Introduce the book by showing this video featuring the Klise sisters
Kate and Sarah describe how they came to create Dying to Meet You




or Introduce book with this book trailer by Charlyn Trussell



Visit the author's web site: Kate Klise

Learn more about the author: Kate Klise BIO

bluebonnet_clipart.gifTexas Bluebonnet Book Literature Activities:

Why is this book written in letters?

A story written in the form of letters between characters is called an epistolary novel. Here is a pretty good explanation:

An epistolary novel is also called a novel of letters, because the narration takes place in the form of letters, possibly journal entries, and occasionally newspaper reports. An epistle is an archaic term for a letter. The epistolary novel is an interesting literary technique, because it allows a writer to include multiple narrators in his or her story. This means the story can be told and interpreted from numerous viewpoints. (source: http://www.wisegeek.com)

An epistolary novel today would also include modern technology communications such as emails, text messages, Twitter tweets, blog entries, and other forms of social networking.

Why do the people have such weird sounding names in this story?

This is the author's fun way of helping you to get to know the characters in the story and to understand their personality.
Look at the list of characters and you decide what the name tells you about their personality.

What's in a Name?
Ignatius B. Grumply (the writer who has come to live at 43 Old Cemetery Road)
Anita Sale (real estate agent trying to sell 43 Old Cemetery Road)
E. Gadds ( Mr. Grumply's lawyer)
Paige Turner (Mr. Grumply's publisher)
Olive C. Spence (the ghost who resides at 43 Old Cemetery Road)
Professors Les and Diane Hope (Seymour's parents)
Seymour Hope (an 11-year-old boy left by his parents to fend for himself in a haunted house)
Frank N. Beans (a private investigator)

Printable activity:
Dying to Understand Your Name-literature connection activity based on the following list of names.



Minor characters have unique Death related names:
Chief librarian: M. Balm (embalm-a technique used to preserve a body)
Grocery store owner: Kay Daver-(cadaver-a corpse or dead body)
Woman whose chicken was stolen: Fay Tality (fatality or death from injury)
dog: Mort Tality (mortality or condition of being mortal, yet susceptible to dying)
kid who likes Mr. Grumply's books: Paul Bearer (pall bearer or a person who carries a coffin at a funeral)
kid who likes Mr. Grumply's books: Sammy Tarry (cemetery or a place where people are buried when they die)


Create a " weird name" for yourself that reflects your type of personality.
Ms. Murphy would be "Olive Books" which sounds like I love books.



bluebonnet_clipart.gifTexas Bluebonnet Book Literature Connections:

A new book will soon arise!

Over_my_dead_body.jpg

Over My Dead Body: 43 Old Cemetery
In this second installment of the 43 Old Cemetery Road series, everything seems to be going well. Olive is her
usual ghostly self, Grumply is not quite so grumpy and Seymour is basking in love. Then an anonymous letter
sends everything into a tailspin. Someone wants Seymour in an orphanage, Grumply in an old folk’s home and
Olive declared non-existent. Will the three friends be able to weather this storm?